Meet Mario!


Mario will be at NYC’s Apple Store in Soho on February 26, at 7pm. Stop by if you are in the area!

For more information:
Click Here

Posted Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Mario and Gwyneth Cook with Oprah!


In case you missed it last fall, Mario and Gwyneth’s episode with Oprah will replay on Thursday, February 12th! In addition to an interview, Mario and Gwyneth cook some of the recipes featured on the show and in Spain…A Culinary Road Trip.

For more information:
http://www.oprah.com

Posted Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Azafrán


Azafrán, or saffron, is one of the world’s most valuable spices. It’s distinctive floral smell and burnt orange color can’t be confused for anything else. It’s vital in many Spanish recipes, including paella. Fun fact: saffron is actually the stigma of bright lavender crocus flowers. Available at www.latienda.com

—CLAUDIA

Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Cortado

A cortado is a small, strong Spanish coffee with just a kiss of warm milk, no foam. With just a small spoonful of sugar, I can think of no better way to start the day.

—MARIO

Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2014

RECIPE OF THE WEEK: MIGAS

This week, Mark and Claudia made migas, essentially Thanksgiving stuffing Spanish style, with Javier Muñoz. Note that it’ s very good served with eggs fried in olive oil.

Serves 6 as a side dish or tapa

6 cups coarse dried bread crumbs
½ cup olive oil www.latienda.com
6 garlic cloves, not peeled
½ pound Spanish chorizo, casings removed and cut into ½ inch dice www.latienda.com
½ pound pancetta in one piece, cut into ½ inch dice
A large bunch of grapes
6 Roasted Red Peppers, peeled, seeded, and cut into wide strips

Put the bread crumbs in a bowl, sprinkle with just enough water to moisten, and cover with damp paper towels. Set aside for 2 hours, or until the bread is evenly moistened. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium–high heat. Add the garlic and stir until lightly browned and fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the chorizo and pancetta and cook, stirring, until the meat is lightly browned and starting to render its fat, about 8 minutes. Add the bread crumbs, mix thoroughly, and cook, stirring, until the crumbs are lightly browned. Serve with the grapes and roasted peppers (peel the garlic cloves if you like, or let your guests do it).

Posted Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Bullboards


There are large billboards all over Spain shaped like bulls and painted black — huge silhouettes looming over the highways. It’s fun to count how many you pass on the long drives. We nicknamed them ‘bullboards.’

— CLAUDIA

Posted Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Press Book

http://www.flickr.com/apps/slideshow/show.swf?v=63961

Posted Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Create

CREATE will be airing the Spain… on the road Again marathon all day Saturday, Jan 10. Learn more – click here!

Posted Tuesday, June 24, 2014

The Martha Stewart Show

Check out Mario and Martha Stewart talking about Spain… on the road Again!
Click Here

Posted Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Almendras

Almendra is the Spanish word for “almond.” Most of Spain’s almonds go into turrón, a sweet, nougaty candy that’s consumed in huge quantities around Christmas. But almonds seem to always be around in Spain. They pop up, sprinkled with salt, at bars with your cocktails; they arrive in small bags on every Spanish flight; they are ground into all sorts of cakes and pastries; and they accompany most cheeses and fruits. They were also our “secret ingredient” for our Iron Chef–style cooking competition.

–GWYNETH

Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Menu del Día

One of Spain’s great eating traditions is the Menu del Día – the menu of the day. Most restaurants, even the smallest, most casual, run–of–the–mill places offer one. It’s almost always a three–course meal, with an option or two for each course. Typical offerings include fish soup, salads with olives and tuna, baked fish, rice dishes, roast chicken, ice cream and custards. Always affordable and reliable, the menu del día is a pleasant tradition, a good way to eat.

–MARK

Posted Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Besugo

When I took Mark to a market in Madrid, we saw a fish called a ‘besugo’ and I started laughing. Mark was confused, so I explained that in Spain there’s a common expression called a “diálogo de besugos,” which is basically a nonsensical discussion where both parties can’t seem to understand each other. Apparently it has to do with the fish’s big–eyed appearance which seems to almost say: “what are you talking about??”

–CLAUDIA

Posted Tuesday, May 27, 2014

RECIPE OF THE WEEK: MARIO’S AJO BLANCO

Ajo blanco is a very traditional version of gazpacho, but it isn’t as well known as its tomato–based sibling. It’s simple and extremely satisfying; a perfectly refreshing cold soup that celebrates almonds, the ‘secret ingredient’ for the cast’s Iron Chef–style cooking competition.

Serves 4
*1 cup blanched whole almonds
*2 garlic cloves, minced
*1/2 cup sherry vinegar
*4 ice cubes
*1 cup extra–virgin olive oil
*Sea salt
*20 seedless green grapes, halved
*Grated zest of 2 lemons

Put the almonds in a small saucepan, cover with cold water, and bring to a boil. Turn off the heat and let stand for 10 minutes, to soften slightly. Drain the almonds, transfer to a blender or food processor, and add the garlic, vinegar, and 4 cups cold water. Blend until smooth, about 1 minute. With the motor running, add the ice cubes, then add the olive oil in a slow, steady stream, blending until thoroughly combined. Season with salt, and refrigerate until chilled.

Divide the grapes and zest between two bowls, pour the soup over, and serve.

Posted Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Something Special About This Week’s Episode

In this week’s episode, it’s fun to know that the last time Mario visited El Escorial – the monastery outside of Madrid – was on a high school field trip when he was a ex–pat teenager living with his family in the country’s capital. On this visit, he remarks that El Escorial is “much prettier than I remembered.”

Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Liquid Nitrogen

Ferran Adriá often employs liquid nitrogen in his cooking, but he explains that it’s “just a tool, like anything else.” In a way, it makes sense – like fire or acid, applying liquid nitrogen to food manipulates it, transforming it from one state to another. Liquid nitrogen is pure nitrogen in a liquid state, and it boils at minus 321°F. Pretty cold. It freezes things on contact. To demonstrate liquid nitrogen’s abilities when we were eating lunch together, Ferran had Chef Paco dip a rose into it, and when it emerged, Gwyneth gently flicked it with her fingers. We were surrounded by shattered petals.

–MARIO

Posted Tuesday, May 6, 2014